Metta Fund

San Francisco Latino Task Force

Mission-based Latino Task Force Plays Central Role in Lowering Barriers to Vaccine Access for Older Adults.

During San Francisco’s Shelter in Place order in spring of 2020, Mission District Neighborhood community activists and organizers came together to form the Latino Task Force (LTF). Born of a growing need to support the Latinx community during Covid-19, the LTF is now a collective of more than three dozen community-based organizations that partners with city government agencies to attend to the needs of the community during these challenging times. They are fiercely community-focused in their implementation of solutions for Latinos, who have faced inequitable health and economic impacts because of the pandemic.

The collective has been working for over a year with the immigrant and Latinx community, houseless, LGBTQ+, youth, and elders who are experiencing barriers to testing and lack of accurate vaccine information. Since February 2021, the LTF has facilitated over 70,000 Covid-19 tests and close to 40,000 vaccines to community members. Combined with a decisive outreach, partnership, and education plan, the Latino Task Force is on track to be one of the most impactful community forces working to combat Covid-19 in San Francisco.

Metta Fund recently made a round of grants to support community-led programs that expand equitable access to Covid-19 vaccinations. Latino Task Force is one of these grant recipients, and since April of 2021, has connected families and elders in the Mission with accurate and accessible information, secured transportation to and from testing and low-barrier vaccination sites, provided bilingual education materials, and continued to collaborate with key community partners in developing and expanding neighborhood vaccination sites.

“Latino Task Force treats our elder community members like our own family – nothing but respect, love, and compassion.” – Azalea Nieves

 

This sentiment has shaped the way that the Latino Task Force has approached the evolving needs of its primarily-Latinx community during the Covid-19 vaccine rollout.

It’s well-known that older adults of color have been hardest hit by the pandemic, underscoring stark racial and ethnic inequities. A comprehensive vaccination strategy that centers around these older adults and their families is key to achieving vaccine equity. In San Francisco, access to information and vaccines has not always been easy, especially within the Latinx community of elders who’ve resided in San Francisco’s Mission District for decades. Community engagement is necessary for combatting Covid-19 in vulnerable and medically underserved communities, and the LTF’s multi-pronged approach has not only helped prove the organization a trusted, go-to resource for community members but has also shown how community and government entities can tackle public health issues together.

The Latino Task Force representatives are trusted messengers and consider themselves their community’s public servants in charge of finding creative ways to center and serve the Latinx population, especially at-risk elders. Part of their initial legwork in the spring of 2020 included Covid testing on site so that community members and elders would not have to travel too far. The LTF was the first testing site of its kind in the country, serving the Latinx community in their own neighborhood.

The LTF strategy for testing the community was methodical and diligent, testing 4,200 people in four days during spring of 2020. Their findings were that, of the 95% total Latinx folks who were tested, over 40% tested positive – pointing to an obvious disparity – and highlighting that many Latinx community members did not have the privilege of working from home, exposing them to the virus at higher rates. Valerie Tulier-Laiwa, Lead Coordinator of the San Francisco Latino Task Force, Mission native, and long-time community activist and organizer, had anticipated that the Latinx community was going to be hit hard.

In addition to on-site testing and vaccine distribution, the LTF worked overtime to make inroads into adult housing and residential locations where elders would be able to receive information and service at home. And later on, in 2021, partnering with the Metta Fund has allowed the LTF to bring the vaccine to older adults who may not have access to existing vaccine sites.

“By offering the vaccine to elders, not only are we saving lives, but we are saving and valuing traditions, stories, wisdom, generational connections, and relationships.”
– Valerie Tulier-Laiwa

A testing site in the historically Latinx Mission-district was critical because it gave them the opportunity to work side by side with the community they were serving and a chance to show the city that it needed to jump into action too, and provide the resources to communities that were being hit the hardest.

“When we first started getting our data,” Valerie said, “we began advocating with the City. We asked permission do what we do best and leveraged the City’s support for the tasks we do well.” This foresight eventually culminated in Unidos En Salud – a partnership between the Latino Task Force, UCSF, the City and County of San Francisco, and the San Francisco Department of Public Health (DPH) to inform and provide for a population that was not being reached by prevailing testing and care systems.

With compassion and respect for elders and community members, the LTF then began offering a “menu of services” to people who wanted the vaccine. Valerie said they had to be creative to figure out who hadn’t been vaccinated and, to make the greatest impact, began providing a full range of services along with a vaccine including food delivery and hot meals, attention at single-room occupancies (SROs), helping with documents like taxes, unemployment during Covid-19, helping to secure Cal Fresh, confirming that mental health services were offered, phone calls and consultations for medical support and check-ins, and primary care.

“We want to meet [our community’s] needs – not just their vaccination needs… That is why the LTF is there: to give them support and information they can trust. We help them feel comfortable and sure that there is someone who’s looking out for them.”
– Valerie Tulier-Laiwa

 

When asked about trust in the elder community, the LTF noted that many older adults live alone, don’t have access to the internet, and don’t have anyone who can take them to a vaccine or testing site. And many of them are still fearful of possible side effects they may experience due to the misinformation they’ve received. “That is why the LTF is there: to give them support and information they can trust. We help them feel comfortable and sure that there is someone who’s looking out for them,” noted Valerie.

Ms. Nieves added that in some situations, she has “taken the time to call some of our elders to personally remind them of their vaccine appointment because I know that they live all alone and some need a little extra help in remembering their appointment time. Something that really impacted me was when I was speaking to an elder who was getting vaccinated, and she told me she was 80 years old and still cleaning houses to make ends meet. Many of our elders are living in these conditions.”

By offering a broad range of services to vulnerable community members, presenting information in an accessible and transparent way, and making Covid-19 testing and vaccines accessible to an exhausted and often overlooked demographic, the LTF has become one of the district’s most trusted organizations for neighborhood elders. Along with their concerted education and outreach efforts, the Task Force also brings an approach to caring for their community through an indigenous lens.

“It’s our approach to care for everyone,” Valerie said, explaining that it is “the indigenous way of life” to take care of women, elders, and children. “At the LTF, a lot of us are considered community service veterans, but we’ve incorporated young people to make sure they’re working with us, which has helped us create a multi-generational approach to caring for our community – it’s not hierarchical, but circular,” she says. “And even if we don’t realize it, we’re bringing something out from our ancestors without realizing it…from the inside out.”

“We also have a mantra,” she said, crediting Tracy Brown Gallardo: “‘Community led, community driven, community implemented.’”

Stories by Sahara Marina Borja; Photography by Jean Melesaine.

image-3-1
image-3-1
2
2
3
3
J_JML4054
J_JML4054
previous arrow
next arrow

Fuerza de Trabajo Latino con Base en La Misión Desempeña Trabajo Importante en Reducir Obstáculos de Acceso a Vacuna Para Adultos Mayores.

En la primavera del año 2020, a partir de la ordenanza municipal Lugar de Abrigo en San Francisco, organizadores y activistas comunitarios pertenecientes al grupo Vecinos del Distrito de la Misión decidieron formar la denominada Fuerza de Trabajo Latino (FTL). Esta tuvo su origen en la creciente necesidad de apoyar la comunidad Latina ante el arribo del virus Covid- 19.

La FTL se ha convertido en un colectivo que agrupa más de tres docenas de organizaciones comunitarias las cuales trabajan a la par de agencias gubernamentales para suplir las necesidades de la comunidad durante esta época tan difícil.

Los grupos están dedicados en su totalidad en implementar soluciones para la comunidad Latina, la cual enfrenta un impacto desestabilizante tanto económico como de salud debido a la pandemia en curso.

El colectivo ha estado trabajando por poco más de un año con las comunidades inmigrante y Latinx, los sin casa, LGBTQ+, y los jóvenes y ancianos que han hallado obstáculos para examinarse, además de falta información exacta con referencia a las vacunas.

Desde febrero de 2021 la FTL ha facilitado más de 70.000 pruebas de Covid-19 y cerca de 40.000 vacunas a los miembros de la comunidad. En combinación con un alcance comunitario decisivo y un plan educativo la Fuerza de Trabajo Latino está en camino a ser uno de los grupos que más impacto ha logrado en combatir el Covid-19 en San Francisco.

El Fondo Metta recientemente ha otorgado una serie de becas de apoyo a programas comunitarios con las cuales expande el acceso equitativo a vacunaciones contra el Covid-19. Fuerza de Trabajo Latino ha sido uno de los grupos recipientes de estas becas y, desde abril de 2021, ha conectado a familias y adultos mayores en el Barrio de la Misión con información exacta y de fácil acceso, habiendo asegurado transporte de y hacia sitios de examen y vacunación, ha provisto materiales educativos de información bilingüe a la vez que continúa colaborando con socios y elementos necesarios en el desarrollo y diseminación de vacunación en sitios claves.

Valerie Tulier-Laiwa, a la cabeza de la Fuerza de Trabajo Latino, nativa de San Francisco, además de ser por mucho tiempo activista y organizadora comunitaria, había de antemano anticipado que la comunidad Latinx iba a ser fuertemente golpeada por el virus.
Además de administrar los exámenes y distribución de la vacuna, la FTL trabajó duramente para poder establecer líneas de acceso dentro de vecindarios y ubicaciones residenciales donde los adultos ancianos pudieran recibir información y servicios en casa. Poco después, en 2021, luego de haberse juntado con la Fundación Metta le permitió a FTL llevar las vacunas necesarias a ancianos adultos que de otra forma no tendrían acceso a los sitios existentes para tal efecto.

“Al ofrecer la vacuna a los ancianos, estamos no sólo salvando vidas, sino también preservando y valorando tradiciones, historias, conocimiento, vínculos generacionales y relaciones,” ha dicho la Sra Tulier-Laiwa.

El haber establecido un sitio de examen y evaluación del virus en el Latinx Mission District, ha sido muy importante puesto que ha ofrecido la oportunidad de trabajar codo a codo con la comunidad a la que sirven, a más de demostrar al gobierno municipal que era necesario su involucramiento para proveer los recursos necesarios en las comunidades que estaban siendo afectadas de manera más crítica.

“Tan pronto comenzamos a generar información,” dice la Sra Tulier-Laiwa, “empezamos a interceder ante el gobierno municipal a favor de la comunidad. Les solicitamos permiso para que nos dejaran hacer nuestro trabajo y logramos el apoyo para las tareas que hacemos bien.” Esta inspiración culminó eventualmente en Unidos En Salud, un trabajo en conjunto que unió a Fuerza de Trabajo Latino, UCFS, el gobierno de la Ciudad y Condado de San Francisco, y el Departamento de Salud Pública de la ciudad, para informar y prestar servicios a aquella parte de la población que no estaba siendo tenida en cuenta por los servicios existentes de examen y ayuda en el sistema de salud.

Con el respeto y la compasión necesarias hacia los ancianos y miembros de la comunidad, el FTL comenzó por ofrecer un “menú de servicios” a las personas que necesitaban la vacuna. Sra Tulier-Laiwa menciona que debieron ser imaginativos para dar con aquellos que no habían sido vacunados. Para tener un mayor impacto, comenzaron a proveer una gama de servicios junto a la vacuna que incluía entrega a domicilio de comida y víveres, atención especial a aquellos que viven en cuartos aislados, a ayudar con documentos tales como Impuestos, servicios de desempleo durante el Covid-19, Cal Fresh (food stamps), confirmación que servicios de salud mental estaban siendo ofrecidos a quien lo necesitara y consultas para exámenes médicos de salud y asistencia primaria.

“Queremos ofrecer una variedad de servicios comunitarios, no únicamente servicios de vacunación” – Sra Tulier-Laiwa

 

Interrogada acerca de la confianza depositada por la comunidad de ancianos, el FTL destaca que muchos adultos ancianos viven solos, no tienen acceso a servicios de Internet y no tienen a quien solicitar que los lleven al sitio de examen o al puesto de vacunación. Además muchos de ellos están todavía temerosos de posibles efectos secundarios, esto debido a cierta desinformación que han recibido de antemano.

“Tan pronto comenzamos a generar información,” dice la Sra Tulier-Laiwa, “empezamos a interceder ante el gobierno municipal a favor de la comunidad. Les solicitamos permiso para que nos dejaran hacer nuestro trabajo y logramos el apoyo para las tareas que hacemos bien.” Esta inspiración culminó eventualmente en Unidos En Salud, un trabajo en conjunto que unió a Fuerza de Trabajo Latino, UCFS, el gobierno de la Ciudad y Condado de San Francisco, y el Departamento de Salud Pública de la ciudad, para informar y prestar servicios a aquella parte de la población que no estaba siendo tenida en cuenta por los servicios existentes de examen y ayuda en el sistema de salud.

Con el respeto y la compasión necesarias hacia los ancianos y miembros de la comunidad, el FTL comenzó por ofrecer un “menú de servicios” a las personas que necesitaban la vacuna. Sra Tulier-Laiwa menciona que debieron ser imaginativos para dar con aquellos que no habían sido vacunados. Para tener un mayor impacto, comenzaron a proveer una gama de servicios junto a la vacuna que incluía entrega a domicilio de comida y víveres, atención especial a aquellos que viven en cuartos aislados, a ayudar con documentos tales como Impuestos, servicios de desempleo durante el Covid-19, Cal Fresh (food stamps), confirmación que servicios de salud mental estaban siendo ofrecidos a quien lo necesitara y consultas para exámenes médicos de salud y asistencia primaria.

“Queremos ofrecer una variedad de servicios comunitarios, no únicamente servicios de vacunación,” dice la Sra Tulier-Laiwa.

Interrogada acerca de la confianza depositada por la comunidad de ancianos, el FTL destaca que muchos adultos ancianos viven solos, no tienen acceso a servicios de Internet y no tienen a quien solicitar que los lleven al sitio de examen o al puesto de vacunación. Además muchos de ellos están todavía temerosos de posibles efectos secundarios, esto debido a cierta desinformación que han recibido de antemano.

“Por este motivo FTL está allí: para ofrecer el apoyo y la información que sean confiables. Les ayudamos a sentirse cómodos y seguros de que hay gente que está allí para ayudarles” – Sra Tulier-Laiwa

 

Azalea Nieves añade que en ciertas situaciones ella se “ha tomado el tiempo de llamar por teléfono a algunos de nuestros adultos ancianos para recordarles personalmente de sus citas de vacunación, porque yo sé que ellos viven solos y requieren de un poco de ayuda para recordarles de sus citas a tiempo. Hubo algo que me hizo mucho impacto cuando hablé con una persona anciana quien me comentó que tenía 80 años de edad y todavía limpiaba casas para poder llegar a fin de mes. Muchos de nuestros ancianos viven en estas condiciones.”

FTL se ha convertido en una de las organizaciones más confiables en los vecindarios donde viven los ancianos, a partir del ofrecimiento de una variada gama de servicios a los miembros de la comunidad, presentando información de manera accesible y transparente, haciendo posible la prueba y vacunación de la enfermedad a un sector demográfico a veces extenuado e ignorado. A la par con el esfuerzo concertado de educación y difusión comunitaria, la Fuerza de Tarea propone dentro de sí misma un acercamiento al cuidado de la comunidad a través de una óptica propia.

La Sra Tulier-Laiwa explica que, “Cuidamos a los miembros de nuestra comunidad de una manera indigenista de vida.” Es decir, nos ocupamos de mujeres, ancianos y niños. “En FTL muchos de nosotros somos considerados veteranos en el cuidado de la comunidad, pero al mismo tiempo hemos incorporado mucha gente joven, quienes nos han ayudado a establecer un acercamiento multi-generacional al respecto, con relación al trabajo comunitario – no se logra de manera jerárquica, sino de forma circular,” dice. “Y aún si no somos conscientes de ello, estamos extrayendo algo de nuestros ancestros sin darnos cuenta… desde dentro.”

“Nuestro mantra es,” dice ella, dando crédito a Tracy Brown Gallardo, “la comunidad dirige, la comunidad conduce, la comunidad implementa.”

Cuentos: Sahara Marina Borja; Fotografía: Jean Melesaine.